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New Year’s Resolutions

Planning for Positive Change

Are you starting to contemplate your New Year resolutions? Or have you resolved never to make a New Year’s resolution again?

If the latter, you’re not alone. Many people get demoralized when, year after year, they make resolutions that they keep for only a few weeks.

Why is this? After all, we all have the best intentions, and the timing (new year, new start) couldn’t be better. A key problem lies in the fact that we place a huge amount of pressure on ourselves. During the last week of December and the first week of January, it can seem that all you hear is, “What are your New Year’s resolutions?” “What are you going to work on this year?”.

 
New Year ResolutionsMake resolutions that matter to YOU.
©iStockphoto/duckycards

And the focus is on the “what” not the “how.” When you are more concerned with the goal you set than on the specifics of how you are going to accomplish it, this can quickly lead to failure.

So, if you resolve to set successful New Year resolutions, read on. Let’s focus on how, this year, you can set yourself up to achieve them!

New Year Resolution Mistakes

There are two common mistakes that people tend to make when they start to make their New Year resolutions: They think about what they “should” do, rather than what they really want to do. And worse, they think about what they should stop doing, rather than what they actually want to achieve. “What should I do this year?” “What should I stop doing?”, “What do other people suggest I should work on?”

To be successful at any change, you need to really want it. Unless you take the time to think about what it is that you really want you (rather than what you should do or should stop doing), you will invariably end up making resolutions that you are not fully committed to. 

Without commitment, you aren’t motivated. After the first setbacks or obstacles, you’ll probably quit. So the first rule of New Year Resolutions is to only make resolutions that you can commit to – don’t make them because it is “the thing to do”, or because someone has told you that you should. 

The irony of it is that New Year’s resolutions have the potential to be very powerful, because making them is such a well recognized practice. Everyone knows that everyone else is setting resolutions. And what a great mutual support network that can provide!

This external motivation and support, along with your internal motivation – your desire to succeed – is what can make the difference between success and failure.

Eight Rules for New Year’s Resolutions

Our Eight Rules for New Year’s Resolutions will help to set you up for success right from the start. Inevitably you will come up against challenges and road blocks along the way; however by planning ahead and following these rules, you’ll be better placed to deal with these problems easily, rather than stumble and quit.

Rule 1: Commit to Your Resolution
Successful resolutions start with a strong commitment to make a change. To succeed, you mustbelieve that you can accomplish what you set out to do, and really want to achieve it. Bolster that belief and desire by doing the following:

  1. Choose resolutions that you really want to achieve – and express them in a positive way.
  2. Announce your resolution to everyone around you – they will help to hold you accountable.
  3. Develop a ceremony to mark the beginning of your commitment – this makes it more “real” and special for you.
  4. Don’t leave your choice of resolution to the last minute – take time to think about your goals, and make sure that you are mentally committed to them.
  5. Questions to ask yourself to determine if you can take ownership of your resolution include:
    1. Is this resolution my idea or someone else’s?
    2. Does this resolution motivate and invigorate me?
    3. Does this resolution sit comfortably with other factors in my life, such as my values and long-term plans?
  6. Remember that there’s no reason why your New Year’s resolution should take all year to achieve!
Tip:
Imagery is a powerful technique to help you own and commit to your resolutions. Picture yourself having attained your goal. How do you feel? How do you look? Where are you, and what are you doing? How do others react to you? By visualizing yourself in the position you desire, you can bolster your belief that you can achieve your goal, and strengthen your desire to do so.

Rule 2: Be Realistic
The key to achieving goals is continued motivation. If you set goals that are too difficult, you risk failing. Consistently failing at something is profoundly de-motivating (it’s no wonder that after a few dismal attempts, some people abandon the idea of New Year’s resolutions altogether!)

  1. Think carefully before setting the same resolution that you set last year. If it didn’t work for you then, make sure that there is good reason that you can achieve it this year. What has changed? Do you have more commitment to make it work? (Be careful, or else you will end up with a repeat performance, and another failed resolution!)
  2. Aim lower, rather than too high – aim for something that is challenging, but that you have a good chance of accomplishing. If there is any doubt, err on the side of caution and expand your goal later if you want to keep improving.
  3. Don’t try to do too much. There is no reason to set more than one or two resolutions. Anymore than that, and you’ll lose focus, and lessen your chances of success in any one area.

Rule 3: Write It Down
A simple but powerful technique for making your goal feel real is to put your resolution into writing. There is something inside us that creates more commitment and drive when we do this. Consider writing your resolution down on pieces of card, and keeping it where you’ll see it often – on your desk, on the fridge door, or in your wallet.

Rule 4: Make a Plan
This is where so many resolutions fall down. Articulating what you want to achieve is one thing; deciding how to do it is quite another. Don’t miss out this step!

  1. Start by envisioning where you want to be.
  2. Then work back along your path to where you are today, writing down all of the milestones that you need to pass in between.
  3. Decide what you will do to reach each of these milestones, at least at a high level. (You can plan in more detail as you reach that stage.)

Rule 5: Be Flexible
Not everything will work out precisely the way you planned. If you are too rigid in your approach to making resolutions, the first minor obstacle can throw you off your course completely.

  1. When creating your plan, try to predict some of the challenges that you will face. Make a contingency plan for the ones that have the highest probability, and mentally prepare yourself for others, just in case they come up.
  2. Realize that your resolution itself may change along the way. As long as this is positive, that’s not failure, it’s reality. As your life changes, so will your goals, dreams, and desires. Remember Rule 1 (Commit to Your Resolution): If you need to make changes to the goal so that you continue to care about it, do so.
Tip:
There is no fixed rule saying that a resolution must be set in January. If your circumstances mean that it is better to wait until March, then do so. Resolution making and goal setting are a year round activity.

Rule 6: Use a System of Reminders
It’s hard to keep focused on your plan when you have many other commitments, responsibilities, and obligations. The best way to stay on top of your resolution is to develop a formal reminder system.

  1. We’ll say it again: have your written resolutions visible at as many times of the day as possible. Leave reminders at work, at home, in the car, on your calendar, in your briefcase, and so on.
  2. Make sure that the actions you have planned are on your To-Do List (perhaps have a special section for them at the top).
  3. Set up reminders in your desktop calendar or subscribe to an email reminder service.
  4. Think creatively about how you can remind yourself of your resolutions, so that they stay in the front of your mind.

Rule 7: Track Your Progress
You won’t know how well you are doing unless you keep track of your progress. This is why your detailed plan is so important. By building excitement around the little successes, you can keep yourself motivated, and keep pushing forwards.

  1. Use a journal and regularly make an entry in it regarding your progress.
  2. Note when you felt particularly pleased with your efforts.
  3. Note when you felt down, or felt like quitting. Over time, look for common themes and decide if there is an underlying issue that needs to be addressed.
  4. Record challenges you faced, as well as things that went better than planned.
  5. Look back at your entries on a regular basis, and use your past experiences to shape your attitude as you move forward.
  6. Ask a friend or family member to call you on pre-defined occasions to discuss your progress.

Rule 8: Reward Yourself
Although knowledge of a job well done can be reward enough, we all enjoy a little treat from time to time. Even the most committed person needs a boost, and sometimes that is best accomplished through an external reward.

When you are developing your plan, make a note of a few milestones where you will reward yourself once you have achieved them. But spread them out – you want to make sure that the rewards remain special, and are not too easy to get!

Key Points 

New Year’s resolutions can be a pain or a pleasure – the choice is yours! If they’re a pain, you may resolve never to make a resolution again, so resolve to make them a pleasure! The starting point is to focus on something that you really want and are ready to give your commitment to. Do this and you’ll be in a great position to stay motivated and be successful!

As you plan your New Year resolutions, apply the Eight Rules to set yourself up for success.

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December 29, 2009 Posted by | 1 | Leave a comment

Mistletoe and Cancer

What is Mistletoe?

European mistletoe (Viscum album) is a plant that grows on several types of trees throughout the world. Its shoots and berries have long been used in herbal medicine.

European mistletoe is different from American mistletoe (the variety commonly used as a holiday decoration).

Uses for Mistletoe

In herbal medicine, mistletoe is typically used to treat the following conditions, although there is limited scientific evidence on its effectiveness:

Mistletoe and Cancer

Laboratory studies have found that mistletoe can stimulate the immune system and kill cancer cells. However, clinical trials in humans have yet to prove that mistletoe is beneficial for cancer patients. Although studies have shown improvements in survival and/or quality of life among people using mistletoe in treatment of cancer, almost all of the trials had major weaknesses that raise doubts about the findings.

Benefits of Mistletoe

There is a lack of scientific evidence to support the use of mistletoe in treatment of high blood pressure, headache, or arthritis.

Here’s a look at other findings on mistletoe’s health effects:

1) Mistletoe and Hepatitis C

In a 2005 study of 21 people with hepatitis C, researchers found that treatment with mistletoe was well-tolerated and led to significant improvements in liver inflammation and quality of life.

2) Mistletoe and Diabetes

Preliminary research indicates that mistletoe may be useful in the management of diabetes. In a 2009 study on rats, scientists found that diabetic animals treated with mistletoe had a significant decrease in blood sugar levels. Mistletoe also appeared to stimulate the secretion of insulin in both diabetic and non-diabetic rats.

Since there is limited evidence on mistletoe’s benefits and risks for people with hepatitis C or diabetes, it’s critical for patients to consult a physician before using this herb.

Mistletoe Side Effects

Use of mistletoe has been linked to following side effects:

  • chills

  • fever

  • headache

  • chest pain

  • diarrhea

  • vomiting

It should be noted that eating raw, unprocessed mistletoe can cause seizures, a slowing of the heart rate, and even death.

Is Mistletoe Safe?

The National Center for Complementary and Alternative Medicine cautions that because mistletoe has not yet been proven to be a safe and effective cancer treatment, it should not be used outside of clinical trials. If you’re considering using mistletoe in treatment of cancer or another condition, make sure to consult your physician.

Taking mistletoe in combination with certain medications (such as blood pressure drugs and antiarrhythmics) may produce harmful effects. Pregnant or breastfeeding women should also avoid mistletoe.

Sources:

Eno AE, Ofem OE, Nku CO, Ani EJ, Itam EH. “Stimulation of insulin secretion by Viscum album (mistletoe) leaf extract in streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats.” Afr J Med Med Sci. 2008 37(2):141-7.

Melzer J, Iten F, Hostanska K, Saller R. “Efficacy and safety of mistletoe preparations (Viscum album) for patients with cancer diseases. A systematic review.” Forsch Komplementmed. 2009 16(4):217-26.

National Center for Complementary and Alternative Medicine. “Mistletoe: Herbs at a Glance [link: http://nccam.nih.gov/health/mistletoe/ataglance.htm%5D.” NCCAM Publication No. D270
Created July 2005
Updated April 2008.

Tusenius KJ, Spoek AM, van Hattum J. “Exploratory study on the effects of treatment with two mistletoe preparations on chronic hepatitis C.” Arzneimittelforschung. 2005;55(12):749-53.

December 29, 2009 Posted by | 1 | 1 Comment

Rose Essential Oil – How to Use Rose Oil

 

What Is Rose Oil?

Rose oil is an essential oil commonly used in aromatherapy. It contains the rose plant’s aromatic compounds, which are thought to possess certain healing properties.

How Does Rose Oil Work?

According to aromatherapy practitioners, inhaling essential oil molecules (or absorbing essential oils through the skin) transmits messages to the limbic system (a brain region responsible for controlling emotions and influencing the nervous system). These messages are believed to affect biological factors such as heart rate, stress levels, blood pressure, breathing, and immune function.

Benefits and Uses of Rose Oil

Although research on rose oil’s health effects is limited, studies suggest that the essential oil may be useful for the following:

1) Stress and Anxiety Relief

In a 2009 study of 40 healthy volunteers, scientists found that those who took in rose oil through their skin felt more relaxed than those who were treated with a placebo. Study members who received rose oil also had a greater decrease in breathing rate and blood pressure than those who received the placebo.

In an earlier study, published in 2004, inhalation of rose oil was found to lower anxiety in a group of rats.

2) Menopausal Symptoms

For a 2008 study of 52 women undergoing menopause, researchers assigned 25 participants to weekly massages with several essential oils (including lavender and jasmine oils in addition to rose and rose geranium oils). After eight weeks, the study members who received massages reported a significantly greater improvement in menopausal symptoms (such as hot flashes) than those who weren’t massaged. However, the study authors were unable to attribute the positive effects to aromatherapy, massage, or the combination of the two therapies.

3) Menstrual Cramps

Topically applied rose oil (when combined with lavender and clary sage oils) may be effective in decreasing the severity of menstrual cramps, according to a 2006 study of 67 female college students. For the study, a blend containing one drop of rose, two drops of lavender, one drop of clary sage, and 5 cc of almond oil was applied in form of an abdominal massage.

How to Use Rose Oil

When combined with a carrier oil (such as jojoba, sweet almond, or avocado), rose oil can be applied directly to the skin or added to baths.

Rose oil also can be inhaled after sprinkling a few drops of the oil onto a cloth or tissue (or by using an aromatherapy diffuser or vaporizer).

Rose oil should not be taken internally without the supervision of a health professional.

Rose Oil and Aromatherapy Massage

Because of the soothing effects and pleasant scent, rose oil is a popular component of aromatherapy massage.

Learn more about the benefits and safety concerns associated with aromatherapy massage.

Sources:

de Almeida RN, Motta SC, de Brito Faturi C, Catallani B, Leite JR. “Anxiolytic-like effects of rose oil inhalation on the elevated plus-maze test in rats.” Pharmacol Biochem Behav. 2004 77(2):361-4.

Han SH, Hur MH, Buckle J, Choi J, Lee MS. “Effect of aromatherapy on symptoms of dysmenorrhea in college students: A randomized placebo-controlled clinical trial.” J Altern Complement Med. 2006 12(6):535-41.

Hongratanaworakit T. “Relaxing effect of rose oil on humans.” Nat Prod Commun. 2009 4(2):291-6.

Hur MH, Yang YS, Lee MS. “Aromatherapy massage affects menopausal symptoms in korean climacteric women: a pilot-controlled clinical trial.” Evid Based Complement Alternat Med. 2008 5(3):325-8.

 

 

December 29, 2009 Posted by | 1 | Leave a comment

Sleep Better – Naturally

 

Getting eight hours of sleep each night helps protect your heart health, keep your stress in check, preserve your memory, and enhance your mood. Yet, a 2009 report from the National Sleep Foundation (NSF) reveals that the number of Americans sleeping a full eight hours nightly has dropped to just 28%. What’s more, previous NSF research shows that 67% of American women frequently experience trouble sleeping, while 43% say that daytime sleepiness gets in the way of their daily activities.

Adopt Healthy Habits

If you need to stop skimping on sleep, start by improving your sleep habits so that you sleep better. Stick to a regular bedtime and wake time; use your bedroom only for sleep and sex; and create a sleep environment that’s dark, quiet, comfortable, and cool.

Maintaining healthy habits throughout the day can also promote sounder sleep. Cutting back on caffeine, getting regular exercise, and spending time outdoors each day can all guide you toward more restful slumber.

Nighttime Stress Relief

Since stress makes it difficult to fall asleep and stay asleep, creating a stress-reducing bedtime routine increases the likelihood of getting your eight hours each night. Here are five soothing activities to consider including in your routine.

1) Yoga

A daily yoga session may help increase total sleep time in people with chronic insomnia, according to a preliminary study published in 2004. When practiced at bedtime, gentle yoga poses should help ease muscle tension and calm your mind.

2) Progressive Muscle Relaxation

Another means of releasing muscle tension, this technique involves slowly tensing and then relaxing every muscle group in your body. Starting with your toes, tense your muscles for five seconds and then relax for 30 seconds. Move on to your legs, and gradually work your way all the way up to your face. For more intense relaxation, incorporate deep breathing into the exercise.

3) Meditation

Research suggests that meditation may benefit people with sleep disorders. Before you go to bed, try devoting five to 10 minutes to a simple meditation practice.

Learn more about meditation.

4) Guided Imagery

Visualizing yourself in a peaceful place (such as a beach, meadow, or mountain setting) can lure your mind away from stress-inducing thoughts and lull you to sleep. To heighten the relaxing effects of this technique, try to imagine the sights, sounds, smells, and textures you might experience in such a place. Listening to a guided imagery CD can also enhance your visualization exercises.

5) Aromatherapy

Certain essential oils such as lavender and chamomile possess sedative properties known to promote sleep. Before bedtime, try taking a bath infused with a few drops of relaxing oils. You can also add a few drops of essential oils to your favorite massage oil and knead away your muscle tension, or shake two or three drops of lavender oil onto your pillowcase and breathe in the calming aroma as you fall asleep.

Learn more about aromatherapy.

Natural Sleep Aids

A number of natural remedies and alternative therapies such as acupuncture, traditional Chinese medicine, ayurveda, and herbal medicine can offer further help in achieving healthy sleep.

Learn about the best natural sleep aids.

Sources:

Khalsa SB. “Treatment of chronic insomnia with yoga: a preliminary study with sleep-wake diaries.” Applied Psychophysiology and Biofeedback 2004 29(4):269-78.

Gooneratne NS. “Complementary and alternative medicine for sleep disturbances in older adults.” Clinics in Geriatric Medicine 2008 24(1):121-38, viii.

December 29, 2009 Posted by | 1 | Leave a comment

Rose Essential Oil – How to Use Rose O

What Is Rose Oil?

Rose oil is an essential oil commonly used in aromatherapy. It contains the rose plant’s aromatic compounds, which are thought to possess certain healing properties.

How Does Rose Oil Work?

According to aromatherapy practitioners, inhaling essential oil molecules (or absorbing essential oils through the skin) transmits messages to the limbic system (a brain region responsible for controlling emotions and influencing the nervous system). These messages are believed to affect biological factors such as heart rate, stress levels, blood pressure, breathing, and immune function.

Benefits and Uses of Rose Oil

Although research on rose oil’s health effects is limited, studies suggest that the essential oil may be useful for the following:

1) Stress and Anxiety Relief

In a 2009 study of 40 healthy volunteers, scientists found that those who took in rose oil through their skin felt more relaxed than those who were treated with a placebo. Study members who received rose oil also had a greater decrease in breathing rate and blood pressure than those who received the placebo.

In an earlier study, published in 2004, inhalation of rose oil was found to lower anxiety in a group of rats.

2) Menopausal Symptoms

For a 2008 study of 52 women undergoing menopause, researchers assigned 25 participants to weekly massages with several essential oils (including lavender and jasmine oils in addition to rose and rose geranium oils). After eight weeks, the study members who received massages reported a significantly greater improvement in menopausal symptoms (such as hot flashes) than those who weren’t massaged. However, the study authors were unable to attribute the positive effects to aromatherapy, massage, or the combination of the two therapies.

3) Menstrual Cramps

Topically applied rose oil (when combined with lavender and clary sage oils) may be effective in decreasing the severity of menstrual cramps, according to a 2006 study of 67 female college students. For the study, a blend containing one drop of rose, two drops of lavender, one drop of clary sage, and 5 cc of almond oil was applied in form of an abdominal massage.

How to Use Rose Oil

When combined with a carrier oil (such as jojoba, sweet almond, or avocado), rose oil can be applied directly to the skin or added to baths.

Rose oil also can be inhaled after sprinkling a few drops of the oil onto a cloth or tissue (or by using an aromatherapy diffuser or vaporizer).

Rose oil should not be taken internally without the supervision of a health professional.

Rose Oil and Aromatherapy Massage

Because of the soothing effects and pleasant scent, rose oil is a popular component of aromatherapy massage.

Learn more about the benefits and safety concerns associated with aromatherapy massage.

Sources:

de Almeida RN, Motta SC, de Brito Faturi C, Catallani B, Leite JR. “Anxiolytic-like effects of rose oil inhalation on the elevated plus-maze test in rats.” Pharmacol Biochem Behav. 2004 77(2):361-4.

Han SH, Hur MH, Buckle J, Choi J, Lee MS. “Effect of aromatherapy on symptoms of dysmenorrhea in college students: A randomized placebo-controlled clinical trial.” J Altern Complement Med. 2006 12(6):535-41.

Hongratanaworakit T. “Relaxing effect of rose oil on humans.” Nat Prod Commun. 2009 4(2):291-6.

Hur MH, Yang YS, Lee MS. “Aromatherapy massage affects menopausal symptoms in korean climacteric women: a pilot-controlled clinical trial.” Evid Based Complement Alternat Med. 2008 5(3):325-8.

December 25, 2009 Posted by | 1 | Leave a comment

Zachary Levi Talks About ‘Alvin and the Chipmunks: The Squeakquel’

 

Zachary Levi in 'Alvin and the Chipmunks: The Squeakquel.'

Zachary Levi in ‘Alvin and the Chipmunks: The Squeakquel.’

© 20th Century Fox

Chuck star Zachary Levi takes on the lead role opposite the most famous singing chipmunks in the world in Alvin and the Chipmunks: The Squeakquel. Levi plays Toby, the geeky cousin of Jason Lee’s character, Dave Seville. When Dave’s sidelined, Toby takes over caring for the loveable squeaky-voiced rodents as they head to high school.

During the LA press day for the 20th Century Fox family comedy, Levi joked that the writers must have had him in mind when they created Toby. “Toby was always envisioned as being me, I guess,” said Levi, laughing. “He’s the burn-out, video game-playing, stuck in a state of arrested development kind of guy, who had a traumatic experience in high school and never really got past that, but loves his video games.”

Levi was able to draw on personal experience to get into character. “I’ve had friends that were very Toby, in my life. I was even very Toby, in my life. I still am a little Toby, in my life. I was trying to draw from all of that stuff. It’s a kid’s movie, so clearly you can’t see him doing anything, but he probably has a substance problem of some kind. I don’t know. He’s there, but he’s not there. He’s Toby,” explained Levi. “That was everything I was trying to put into that, and I think it comes across. I hope it does. I know my manager was like, ‘All right, well, I’ve now seen you play a stoner and that’s good. You’re done. You don’t need to do that anymore.'”

Going a Little Nuts Over Imaginary Chipmunks

Starring opposite Alvin, Theodore and Simon meant Levi was actually working opposite, well, nothing. Asked if talking to imaginary Alvin, Theodore, and Simons drove him a little nutty by the end of the shoot, Levi replied, “I haven’t had any hallucinations yet, but there’s a good chance, especially after the movie comes out and people are calling and saying, ‘Hey, I saw the Chipmunks!’ Then it’s fresh in your mind and, all of a sudden, you’re sitting in your room and Theodore just wants to cuddle.”

Levi admits it was a little difficult actually delivering a performance without his costars there to bounce off of. “You’re acting to thin air. There’s no way around that. You rehearse with stuffed animals, not that that’s much better. It’s still inanimate objects. There were three lovely girls off camera, reading the voices, and prop people who had them on these long antennae, moving them around. But, then there’s nothing there and you’re just a crazy person, talking to yourself. That’s an exercise in sanity,” said Levi.

“It definitely was a challenge, and a good one, especially since, nowadays, more and more movies are made this way, with either green screen or CG in a live-action environment – like Chipmunks is. One of my best friends, Joel David Moore, just did Avatar and he was telling me about all the mo-cap [motion capture] that they did. I don’t even know what that’s got to be like. First of all, you look completely ridiculous. You’re wearing a unitard with little balls all over it, and you’re supposed to take it very seriously. I don’t know how you can take anything seriously, wearing a unitard. And, there’s nothing there. I don’t know what that’s like. But, doing this and just having to emote with and react to nothing, it’s really, really trippy.”

Levi said it was a little scary being the only person on camera during his scenes with the Chipmunks. “That was a little odd. But wherever God puts you, you just be thankful for that, do the best you can and hope that it doesn’t completely look ridiculous at the end of the day. But I think it all came together good. I was really anxious to see how all the eye lines worked out. I was like, ‘Man, I hope I didn’t screw all of that stuff up.’ But, of course, they were watching it and telling you, ‘Hey, you’re looking off into space right now. Make sure you look down at Alvin.’ So when I was watching it, I believed that I was looking at things that weren’t really there, so hopefully the kids will.”

Even before he worked on Alvin and the Chipmunks: The Squeakquel Levi was a fan of the chipper trio. “It’s just amazing that The Chipmunks have been around as long as they have. They’re old. My mom, when she was eight, knew The Chipmunks. When I was eight, I knew a whole new idea of The Chipmunks. I met the Chipmunks when they came out again in the ‘80s with the Saturday morning Chipmunks show and The Chipmunk Adventure. That was a really good movie. Me and my sister watched it many, many times when we were kids,” admitted Levi. “When I met the Bagdasarians, I don’t think they believed me when I was like, ‘I know your stuff. I’m familiar with your work.’ So to be able to be a part of the Chipmunks dynasty, it really is an honor. There aren’t many things like this that have lasted this long and stood the test of time, that are still relevant, no matter how you slice it. Parents, their kids and their kids know who the Chipmunks are. That’s three generations of fans of Alvin, Simon and Theodore, and the Chipettes.”

December 25, 2009 Posted by | 1 | Leave a comment

The Division of Drug Information (DDI) is CDER’s focal point for public inquiries. We serve the public by providing information on human drug The Division of Drug Information (DDI) is CDER’s focal point for public inquiries. We serve the public by providing information on human drug products and drug product regulation by FDA. The U.S. Food and Drug Administration approved the first generic versions of Aricept (donepezil hydrochloride) orally disintegrating tablet s on Dec. 11. Donepezil hydrochloride is indicated for the treatment of dementia related to Alzheimer’s disease. Although other generic versions of donepezil hydrochloride are already available, the orally disintegrating tablets dissolve on the tongue, without having to be swallowed whole. This may make it easier to take the medication for older or disabled patients who have difficulty swallowing. For more information, please visit: Donepezil and drug product regulation by FDA. The U.S. Food and Drug Administration approved the first generic versions of Aricept (donepezil hydrochloride) orally disintegrating tablet s on Dec. 11. Donepezil hydrochloride is indicated for the treatment of dementia related to Alzheimer’s disease. Although other generic versions of donepezil hydrochloride are already available, the orally disintegrating tablets dissolve on the tongue, without having to be swallowed whole. This may make it easier to take the medication for older or disabled patients who have difficulty swallowing. For more information, please visit: Donepezil

December 22, 2009 Posted by | 1 | Leave a comment

 

 

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

December 18, 2009 Posted by | 1 | Leave a comment

Jeff Bridges in ‘Crazy Heart’

Jeff Bridges in ‘Crazy Heart.’

© Fox Searchlight

Four-time Oscar nominee Jeff Bridges is earning major awards buzz for his powerful performance in Crazy Heart, the touching story of an aging country singer. Bridges plays Bad Blake, an alcoholic loner who travels the backroads playing his music to less than standing room only crowds in bowling alleys, bars, and other smaller venues. Bad Blake’s been on the road for years, never settling down and never far from a drink. But when a pretty journalist (played by Maggie Gyllenhaal) asks for an interview, Bad Blake finally feels a connection with someone and finally has a reason to try to clean up his act.

Jeff Bridges didn’t immediately jump at the opportunity to star in this film from first time feature film director Scott Cooper. “When I first got the script, there wasn’t any music attached to it so I took a passer on it,” recalled Bridges. “And then when I found out from my good buddy, T-Bone Burnett, that he was going to do it if I was going to do it, then that filled in that empty, missing piece. So when he got involved, I knew the music was going to be top notch, and that got me to the party really quick.”

At the LA press day for the Fox Searchlight film, Bridges said he could relate to Bad Blake on a personal level. As an actor, Bridges’ life is often as nomadic as Bad Blake’s. According to Bridges’ wife, the two have been apart for 11 months this year due to Jeff’s acting commitments. “That’s tough. That’s the hardest part, for me. But, we’ve been married for 33 years and we’ve done this a lot together, so we know the routine and how much we depend on each other. It’s great to have a partner like that.”

Bridges added, “But there is a similarity to acting and singing. One of the things that’s appealing about country music in general is that it’s dealing with human emotions that people can relate to. We can all relate to not only the fear of failure, but the fear of success and what we do to ourselves when we get successful. Once you get to the top of the mountain, there’s only one place to go. You roll down. So, how do you deal with that? A lot of us deal with it by numbing ourselves. That’s our strategy. We slow ourselves down. So, I can relate to that, just as a human being. Just being alive, you struggle with that.”

A Cameo Appearance By an Actor Not Normally Associated with Music

Bad Blake mentors a young singer/songwriter, Tommy Sweet, and then Tommy’s career takes off while Bad Blake’s hits the skids. Irish actor Colin Farrell shows up to play Tommy.

“He was great to work with,” said Bridges of his time on the set with Farrell. “With movies, you only have a certain time to pull it all together. For this one, we just had 24 days to do it, so you’re really looking for comrades that can get the fire going, as quickly as possible. I think Colin worked maybe four or five days, but we hit it off right off the bat. We approach the work in a similar way and got along great. It was a joy working with him. I’ve admired him. The first time I saw him was in Tigerland, and I’ve been keeping up with his career. I loved In Bruges. I thought that was a great movie. And then, singing together is a great way to strike up a relationship with your fellow actors, when you harmonize. That all fell into place really well.”

The Importance of Mentors

Bad Blake takes Tommy Sweet under his wing in Crazy Heart, and in real life Bridges had mentors of his own to watch over and guide him. “My dad was my mentor. Unlike a lot of actors, he really encouraged all of his kids to go into show business. He loved it so much. I remember when I was a little kid, he came up to me and said, ‘Hey, you wanna be in Sea Hunt? There’s a little part.’ That was a TV series my dad had in the ‘60s. And I said, ‘I don’t know.’ He said, ‘Well, you get to get out of school. You can make some money and buy some toys.’ So I said okay, and then I remember him sitting me on his bed and giving me the basics of acting and teaching me how to do it.”

“And, of course, my brother is my mentor. He took up where my dad left off. We worked on scenes to get my agent. And then I remember a big turning point in my career was doing a movie version of The Iceman Cometh, and I got to work with all these masters, like Robert Ryan, Fredric March and Lee Marvin. Most of my scenes were with Robert Ryan and I learned a lot from working with him, about fear and insecurity. I remember doing a scene with him across the table in a bar, and we were waiting for the scene. He took his hands off the table and there were two big puddles of sweat on the table. I said, ‘Bob, gee, after all these years, you’re still frightened, nervous and scared?’ And he said, ‘Oh, yeah. I’d be really scared if I wasn’t scared.’ That let me know that fear is always going to be with you. It’s how you deal with that. It’s hopeless to think you’re going to get rid of that.”

December 18, 2009 Posted by | 1 | Leave a comment

Drug Information Update- FDA Approves First Generic Aricept to Treat Dementia Related to Alzheimer’s Disease

FDA/CDER/Division of Drug Information (DDI)

The Division of Drug Information (DDI) is CDER’s focal point for public inquiries. We serve the public by providing information on human drug products and drug product regulation byFDA.


 

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration approved the first generic versions of Aricept (donepezil hydrochloride) orally disintegrating tablet s on Dec. 11. Donepezil hydrochloride is indicated for the treatment of dementia related to Alzheimer’s disease.

Although other generic versions of donepezil hydrochloride are already available, the orally disintegrating tablets dissolve on the tongue, without having to be swallowed whole. This may make it easier to take the medication for older or disabled patients who have difficulty swallowing. 

For more information, please visit: Donepezil

December 18, 2009 Posted by | 1 | Leave a comment