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“Lost” Oldies

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Songs That Are Themes For Characters

Desmond:
“Make Your Own Kind of Music,” “Mama” Cass Elliot

This Barry Mann-Cynthia Weil composition was a 1969 adult contemporary hit for “Mama” Cass Elliot of the Mamas and the Papas, and is often used in conjunction with the Desmond Hume character. It’s first heard (and seen) being played in the Dharma Initiative’s Swan station in the episode “Man of Science, Man of Faith,” and similarly during the episode “Adrift.” It also plays in the bar Desmond visits during his flashback in the episode “Flashes Before Your Eyes.” A sitar version is heard in the “listening station” Penelope has set up to find Desmond during the episode “Live Together, Die Alone, Part 1.”

Kate:
“Walkin’ After Midnight,” Patsy Cline

One of Patsy Cline’s biggest hits, this 1957 smash — Cline’s signature song — is often used to reference Kate in the series. It’s first heard in “What Kate Did,” as Kate picks it out and plays it on the Swan record player. In “Left Behind,” it plays in the tow truck that picks Kate up and brings her to the Iowa gas station where she meets Cassidy. For some reason, it also plays in Christian Shepherd’s car during “Two For The Road,” although his passenger is Ana Lucia, not Kate.

Claire/Aaron:
“Catch A Falling Star,” Perry Como

Perry Como’s 1957 smash, the first single ever to be certified gold, is always referenced by Claire, usually in connection to her son, Aaron, although the recording itself has never actually been played. Aaron’s mobile plays the melody in “Maternity Leave,” and “crazy” Claire sings it while imprisoned (and when leaving) the Temple in “Sundown.” Finally, in the episode “Whatever Happened, Happened,” Kate sings it to Aaron when she visits Cassidy.

Hurley:
“Shambala,” Three Dog Night

One of Three Dog Night’s last big hits, 1973’s “Shambala” is a tale of a utopian paradise of sorts, which makes it ironic as a theme for the perennially bad-luck Hurley. It plays in “Tricia Tanaka Is Dead” as a young Hurley fixes the Camaro with his father, David, then again in the Dharma van after Hurley fixes it. (In “The Man Behind The Curtain” this song also plays in the van as Ben kills his father, Roger.)

Juliet:
“Downtown,” Petula Clark

The song which made Petula a British Invasion darling in the Us back in 1965 is played by Juliet during the “Tale of Two Cities” episode, just before she heads to the Dharma bookclub on the day of the Oceanic 815 crash. When Juliet arrives at the airport to begin her service with the Dharma Initiative in “One Of Us,” this song plays in the car during the flashback.

Other Songs Heard Or Referenced More Than Once

“He’s Evil,” The Kinks

Charlie sings this obscure 1974 Kinks deep cut (from Preservation: Act II) while he fishes with Jin in “The 23rd Psalm,” but even though the recording itself plays in Charlie and Liam’s flat during the “Fire + Water” “Moonlight Serenade,” Glenn Miller

Hurley and Sayid first hear this sweet swing classic on a radio at the Arrow station in the episode “The Long Con,” and it plays on Jack’s car radio during a flashback in “Tale of Two Cities.” Aside from the fact that Miller himself vanished during a plane ride, the song appears to have no specific meaning.

“She’s Got You,” Patsy Cline

Another Cline classic, this tune is identified with Kate: in “Eggtown” it plays as Kate and Claire hang out in their Dharma apartment; during “Whatever Happened, Happened” it plays in Kate’s car as she goes to visit Cassidy — whom she eventually leaves Aaron with. Could this song be a play on Kate taking Aaron from Claire?

Songs Mentioned Or Heard Only Once

Season 1

Episode: “Tabula Rasa”
“Leavin’ On Your Mind,” Patsy Cline

Plays on the radio in Ray Mullen’s truck as he prepares to betray Kate to the authorities.

Episode: “House Of The Rising Sun”
“Are You Sure?,” Willie Nelson

One of a number of songs Hurley listens to this season on his CD player as we get a panoramic view of the survivors and their doings. 

Season 2

Episode: “Everybody Hates Hugo”
“My Conversation,” The Uniques

This song plays during Hurley’s dream in the Swan station. Later in the episode, we hear Rose humming it!
“Up On The Roof,” The Drifters
This classic is playing on the Swan record player as Hurley and Rose figure out how to distribute the food.Episode: “What Kate Did”
“The End Of The World,” Skeeter Davis

A pop-country standard that plays in the diner where Diane, Kate’s mother, works, and where she essentially disowns her daughter. 

Episode: “The Hunting Party”
“Fall On Me,” Pousette-Dart Band

A real obscurity heard on the Swan record player. 

Episode: “Fire + Water”
“Papa Loves Mambo,” Perry Como

Another Como hit on the Swan record player. Hurley and Libby become closer during this song. 

Episode: “The Whole Truth”
“Pushin’ Too Hard,” The Seeds

A garage-punk classic heard on the Swan record player. 

Episode: “Lockdown”
“I’ll Share My World With You,” George Jones

Locke and Helen’s theme of sorts; it plays in their house as they prepare for the picnic where he plans to propose to her.
“Compared To What,” Les McCann and Eddie Harris
Another great (and unlikely) Top 40 hit from the Swan archives. 

Episode: “S.O.S.”
“These Arms Of Mine,” Otis Redding

Sort of a theme for Rose and Bernard; it’s playing on her car radio when they meet, and is later heard on the Swan record player.
“The Right Girl For Me,” Frank Sinatra
A violin version of this tune is played as Bernard proposes to Rose. 

Episode: “Live Together, Die Alone, Part 1”
“Chains And Things,” B.B. King

A 1971 single from the blues master that’s heard on the Swan record player.

Season 3

Episode: “Further Instructions”
“I Feel Like Going Home,” Muddy Waters

This blues number, pointedly, plays in Locke’s truck as he heads towards the compound he thinks will be his new life.

Episode: “The Cost Of Living”
“I Wonder,” Brenda Lee

A song of romantic regret that takes on new meaning, playing as it does as Pickett (and the Others) sends his wife Colleen off in a Viking funeral. 

Episode: “I Do”
“Slowly,” Ann-Margret

A sexy song playing during Kate’s flashback that presages her amorous hotel room encounter with her fiance, Kevin. 

Episode: “Greatest Hits”
“Carrie Anne,” The Hollies

This British Invasion classic of innocence remembered is playing during Charlie’s #4 best thing to ever happen to him: learning to swim with his father as a child. 

Season 4

Episode: “Meet Kevin Johnson”
“It’s Getting Better,” Mama Cass Elliot

Cass’ first solo hit and the precursor to “Make Your Own Kind Of Music” plays in Micheal’s car, ironically, as he tries to commit suicide.Episode: “Cabin Fever”
“Everyday,” Buddy Holly and the Crickets

Plays when a young Emily, already pregnant with John Locke, prepares to meet his father on a date; not quite appropriate for 1956, when the scene is set, as the song wasn’t actually released until the following year. 

Season 5

Episode: “Because You Left”
“Shotgun Willie,” Willie Nelson

A song that Willie recorded just before his 1975 commercial breakthrough, this appears to have no particular significance in its scene, being played as Pierre Chang gets up to feed baby Miles. Unless the fact that the record skips signifies a rift in time…Episode: “The Lie”
“Dream Police,” Cheap Trick

A power-pop classic heard as Hurley goes to buy new clothes at the convenience store; possibly included simply because he was on the run. 

Episode: “LaFleur”
“Candida,” Tony Orlando and Dawn

Another golden early-Seventies AM favorite, Dharma security man Jerry dances with nurse Rosie to this at the main station in 1977. 

Episode: “Namaste”
“Ride Captain Ride,” Blues Image

A one-hit wonder golden oldie, this is playing during the 1977 Dharma orientation. The lyrics deal with a group of people who go off to have adventures and leave their friends who won’t join them behind. 

Episode: “He’s Our You”
“I Can’t Give You Anything But Love, Baby,” Billie Holiday

Ironically plays on Oldham’s record player before he interrogates Sayid 

Episode: “Some Like It Hoth”
“It Never Rains In Southern California,” Albert Hammond
“Love Will Keep Us Together,” Captain and Tennille

Two more golden AM oldies that play in the Dharma van. 

Episode: “The Incident, Part 1”
“Three Cigarettes (In An Ashtray),” Patsy Cline

Once again, Kate is identified with Patsy… this time, in a childhood flashback where she tries to shoplift a lunchbox, and receives Jacob’s touch. 

Season 6

Episode: “The Substitute”
“Search And Destroy,” Iggy and the Stooges

A good fit for the Sawyer character, this proto-punk milestone is what he gets drunk to as the Man in Black comes to talk to him following Juliet’s death.

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April 6, 2010 - Posted by | 1

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